Atlanta named one of the top 10 cities with most homes under $100,000

by Lauren Brocato

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Finding a home under the $100,000 mark is difficult to do these days as national prices continue to rise. The data team at Realtor.com found the top 10 cities that have the largest number of bargain-priced homes, with Atlanta coming in at number 10.

Though homes within the center of everything are likely to be on the pricier side, areas past about 4 miles outside downtown Atlanta contain many affordable homes. The median home list price in Atlanta is $330,888, which is out of reach for many Americans. Thankfully for buyers, the city boasts 1,087 homes on the market that are all listed under $100,000.

For under $100,000 in Atlanta, you can find a home equipped with three bedrooms, two baths and a yard in a suburban school district. The only catch is that for a home at that price, the buyer may have to get a deal on a fixer-upper or choose a location in a town in the early stages of development.

“To be in a nice property, you’re in the half-millions,” says Ryan Sconyers, a real estate agent with Graham Seeby Keller Williams. “However, buyers who aren’t seeking a big house and backyard can still pick up a condo in a nice neighborhood for around $125,000,” Sconyers says.

Homes in the Midwest or Rust Belt area are where buyers can find some of the best bargain prices, especially since the median home prices in those areas are already lower than those in other places like costal cities.

Even cities like Chicago and New York have a considerable amount of affordable homes. Though they might not be right in the heart of the city, these homes are still worth the price.

“Bargains definitely exist. But buyers should go in with their eyes open,” said Chief Economist of Realtor.com Danielle Hale. “In some of those areas, $100,000 can buy a pretty decent home that maybe needs a little bit of updating. In others, it might be a home that needs an awful lot of work and might not-yet-up-and-coming neighborhoods.”